Leopold Institute Staff- Brett DavisLeopold Institute Staff- Brett Davis

GIS Specialist, Wilderness Fire


Brett Davis

Education:

  • M.S., Forest Sciences - Colorado State University, Fort Collins. 2002.
    Thesis: Identifying Likely Wildfire Ignition Points Using Topographic Analysis, Statistical Investigations and Artificial Intelligence.
  • B.A., Environmental, Population and Organismic Biology / Psychology - University of Colorado, Boulder. 1994.

Background:

Brett joined the Leopold Institute in 2002 as a GIS specialist mainly focused on wildland fire. Upon his arrival he began working on the construction of fire atlases and multi-scale fire history analyses. He has worked on major long-term projects involving modeling wildland fire burn probability to determine if Wildland Fire Use (WFU) would be capable of restoring natural fire regimes in wilderness areas and retrospectively modeling suppressed lightning ignitions to determine what their potential behavior and effects might have been. His next major project involves exploring the potential consequences of alternative management response strategies for wildland fires that occurred in 2007 and 2008. In this project he will be retrospectively modeling a number of alternative fire management approaches in order to compare their potential behavior and effects to the actual behavior and effects of actual wildland fire incidents. For more detail on these projects follow the links below.

Before joining the Leopold Institute staff Brett was a research assistant at Colorado State University (CSU), provided user support for the Advanced Technology Lab at CSU, was a GIS and Resource Technician at the City of Boulder's Open Space Department and served an internship in the Russian far east helping to develop a sustainable land use plan for the Ussuri watershed.


Research Interests:

  • The application of GIS and remote sensing to natural resource conservation especially in regard to:
    • Wildfire ecology and behavior
    • Supporting the return of wildfire to its historic role in maintaining healthy ecosystems
    • Tracking and managing non-native invasive weeds
    • Balancing human and ecosystem needs in a sustainable fashion
  • Modeling wildland fire behavior and effects

Current Projects:


Completed Projects:




Professional History:

GIS Specialist, Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute, Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, Missoula, Montana: May 2002 to present.

Research Assistant, Joint Fire Science Project, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado: June 1999 to June 2001.

User Support - Advanced Technology Lab, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado: June 1999 to April 2002.

GIS Technician / Resource (IPM) Technician - City of Boulder Open Space Department, Boulder, Colorado: March 1995 to January 1999.


Publications in Progress

Davis, Brett H.; Miller, Carol. [In press]. What if we didn't suppress fire?. In Proceedings: Rethinking Protected Areas in a Changing World: The 2009 George Wright Society biennial conference on parks, protected areas and cultural sites.

Tarnay Lee W.; Davis, Brett H.; van Wagtendonk, Jan. [In press]. Modeled and actual impacts of fire management on carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions in Yosemite National Park. Proceedings: Rethinking Protected Areas in a Changing World: The 2009 George Wright Society biennial conference on parks, protected areas and cultural sites.

van Wagtendonk, Kent.; Davis Brett H. [In press]. Revisiting spatial patterns of lightning strikes and fires in Yosemite National Park. Proceedings: Rethinking Protected Areas in a Changing World: The 2009 George Wright Society biennial conference on parks, protected areas and cultural sites.

Davis, Brett H.; Miller, Carol; Parks, Sean. [In preparation]. Retrospective fire modeling: quantifying the impacts of fire suppression. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-***. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station; ** p. (Contact Brett if you're interested in seeing a draft)


Selected Publications:

To access other publications by Brett Davis, please click here.

Davis, B. H., J.W. van Wagtendonk, J. Beck and K. van Wagtendonk. 2009. Modeling fuel succession. Fire Management Today. 69(2):18-21.
Leopold Publication Number 681

Carver, Steve; Watson, Alan; Waters, Tim; Matt, Roian; Gunderson, Kari; Davis, Brett. 2009. Developing computer-based participatory approaches to mapping landscape values for landscape and resource management. In: Planning Support Systems Best Practice and New Methods. Series: GeoJournal Library , Vol. 95. Geertman, Stan; Stillwell, John Charles Harold (Eds.) 2009, XXII, 490 p. Hardcover ISBN: 978-1-4020-8951-0. Available online: http://www.springerlink.com/content/978-1-4020-8951-0
Leopold Publication Number 673

Miller, C.; Davis, B. 2009. Quantifying the consequences of fire suppression in two California national parks. The George Wright Forum 26(1): 76-88.
Leopold Publication Number 670

Watson, Alan; Matt, Roian; Waters, Tim; Gunderson, Kari; Carver, Steve; Davis, Brett. 2008. Mapping tradeoffs in values at risk at the interface between wilderness and non-wilderness lands. Proceedings: III International Symposium on Fire Economics, Planning, and Policy: Common Problems and Approaches, 29 April - 2 May, 2008. Carolina, Puerto Rico. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-19x. USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Station.
Leopold Publication Number 643

Davis, Brett, Carol Miller. 2004. Modeling Wildfire Probability Using a GIS. In: Proceedings of the ASPRS 2004 Annual Conference, Denver, USA. May 23-28. American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, 2004. Available on CD only.
Leopold Publication Number 509


Posters

What if we didn't suppress fire? Presented at: Rethinking Protected Areas in a Changing World: The 2009 George Wright Society biennial conference on parks, protected areas and cultural sites. Portland, OR, March 2nd-6th, 2009.

Retrospective fire modeling to quantify the cumulative effects of suppression. Presented at: Pacific Coast Fire Conference: Changing Fire Regimes, Goals and Ecosystems. Organized by: California Association of Fire Ecologists, San Diego, CA, December 1st-4th, 2008.

Retrospective fire modeling to quantify the cumulative effects of suppression. Presented at: 2nd Fire behavior and Fuels Management Conference: San Destin, FL, March 26-30, 2007.

Retrospective fire modeling to quantify the cumulative effects of suppression. Presented at: Geospatial 2007 Conference: Portland, OR, May 7-11, 2007.

Retrospective fire modeling to quantify the cumulative effects of suppression. Joint Fire Science Program Governing Board visit: Lubrecht Experimental Forest, Montana, September 14, 2006.

Probability of burning model improves wildland fire planning. Presented at: The Resource Management Tools & Geospatial Conference in Phoenix, AZ, April 19-21, 2005.

Can wildland fire use restore historical fire regimes in wilderness? 2005 Joint Fire Science Program Principle Investigators Workshop: San Diego, CA, November 1-4, 2005.

Using the probability of burning to plan for wildland fire use. Presented at: 2nd Annual International Wildland Fire Ecology and Fire Management Congress: Orlando, FL, Nov 16-20, 2003.


Presentations

Can wildland fire use restore historical fire regimes in wilderness and other unroaded lands? Presented at: 2004 Joint Fire Science Program Principle Investigators Workshop: Phoenix, AZ, April 6, 2004.

Can wildland fire use restore historical fire regimes in wilderness and other unroaded lands?: Study results for the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness Area. Presented at: Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness Spring Fire Use Meeting: Hamilton, MT, May 6, 2004.

Modeling wildfire probability using a GIS. Presented at: The American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing Annual Conference: Denver, CO, May 23, 2004.

Can wildland fire use restore historical fire regimes in wilderness and other unroaded lands?: Study results for Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Parks. Presented to land managers at Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Park, Park Headquarters, June 9, 2004.

Can wildland fire use restore historical fire regimes in wilderness and other unroaded lands?: Study results for Yosemite National Park. Presented to land managers at Yosemite National Park, El Portal, CA, June 10, 2004.

Can wildland fire use restore historical fire regimes in wilderness and other unroaded lands?: Study results for Great Smokey Mountains National Park. Presented to land managers at Great Smokey Mountains National Park, Park Headquarters, October 5, 2004.

Can wildland fire use restore historical fire regimes in wilderness and other unroaded lands?: Study results for Gila-Aldo Leopold Wilderness Areas. Presented to land managers at Gila National Forest, Silver City, NM, October 15, 2004.

Research to Support Wildland Fire Use Decisions in Yosemite National Park. Presented at: The 2006 Yosemite Fire Science Symposium, Yosemite National Park, May 9, 2006.

Retrospective fire modeling to quantify the impacts of suppression; Study results for Yosemite National Park from the project: Learning from the past: Retrospective analyses of fire behavior in Yosemite and Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Parks. Presented to: land managers at Yosemite National Park, El Portal, CA, December 19, 2007,

Retrospective fire modeling to quantify the impacts of suppression; Study results for Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Park from the project: Learning from the past: Retrospective analyses of fire behavior in Yosemite and Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Parks. Presented to: land managers at Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Park, Park Headquarters, January 17, 2008.

Contact Information:

Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute
790 E. Beckwith Ave.
Missoula, MT 59801
Phone: 406-329-2127
Fax: 406-329-2124
E-mail: bhdavis@fs.fed.us



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