Leopold Institute Research ProjectsLeopold Institute Research Projects

The following list, alphabetical by title, describes Leopold Institute supported research projects currently in progress. To search projects, click on search research projects below.

Current Research Projects | Completed Research Projects
Search Research Projects | Search Publications

Click on a research category below to display all projects in that category. Click on an arrow to display the titles of projects in a category. Projects are listed by date.

Wilderness Lake

HOME  |  RESEARCH PROGRAM  |  RESEARCH APPLICATION PROGRAM
ABOUT US  |  STAFF  |  HOT TOPICS  |  PUBLICATIONS  |  PROJECTS
CONFERENCES & WORKSHOPS  |  DATABASES & LINKS  |  SITEMAP



Ecosystem Disturbance
   FIRE AND FIRE RESTORATION

DEVELOPMENT AND DELIVERY OF SCIENCE SYNTHESIS:FUELSTOOLS AND TRAINING MATERIALS

WHO: Anne Black - Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute, Elaine Sutherland - Rocky Mountain Research Station, Sarah McCaffrey - Northern Research Station, Jamie Barbour, Dave Peterson - Pacific Northwest Research Station, Russ Graham - Rocky Mountain Research Station

WHAT: We seek to strategically improve dissemination of the national Science Synthesis:FuelsTools, which resulted from the Science Synthesis and Integration project (also known as Applied Wildland Fire Research in support of Project Level Hazardous Fuels Planning). For more information on the preceding project, please visit: http://www.fs.fed.us/fire/tech_transfer/synthesis/synthesis_index.

An initial set of interviews with recent trainees and users will provide a comprehensive evaluation of existing dissemination and training materials. The evaluation will guide development of additional training and support documentation and allow us to more effectively target potential users. Through the evaluation phase, we also seek to identify and describe the replicable and general tasks involved in the phases of knowledge diffusion described in the diffusion of inovation literature.

Activities include: - evaluation of FY05 training mechanisms - development of web-based trainings and case examples - update of the existing website - capture and publication of findings and lessons learned to assist others in conducting similar work or training activities - provision of consultations, presentations and trainings.

WHEN: 2005-2006

WHERE: Western United States

WHY: Specifically, the national Science Synthesis effort represented a significant expenditure of National Fire Plan funds and research effort. However, to gain maximum value from this effort, land management staff need to know about the tools and how to use them. More generally, knowledge of the effectiveness of various training media - fact sheets, General Technical Reports, workshops, presentations - is often compiled locally by project staff, but remains largely distributed and thus unavailable for others to learn from, improve or emulate.

PRODUCTS:
Leopold Institute Publications
Black, Anne.; Perin, Sue. 2007. Delivering the Science Synthesis: FuelsTools. Journal of Forestry 105(4):192-200.
Leopold Publication Number 605

Project website

   OTHER

CAMPSITE RESTORATION IN THE SAWTOOTH WILDERNESS

WHO: David Cole - Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute, Troy Hall - University of Idaho, Tom DeLuca - University of Montana, Liese Dean - Sawtooth National Forest

WHAT: Test the effectiveness of restoration techniques in restoring soil and vegetation conditions on long-denuded campsites. In particular, survivial and growth of transplanted Vaccinium scoparium will be assessed. Treatments employed are (1) scarification, (2) amendments of two types and two amounts of locally-collected organic matter, (3) amendments with a bioorganic fertilizer, (4) application of a mulch mat, (5) watering, and slash piling.

For more information on this project, click here.

WHEN: 2006-2011

WHERE: Sawtooth Wilderness, Idaho

WHY: To improve our ability to restore vegetation on barren campsites, particularly those with an understory dominated by slow-growing low shrubs, such as Vaccinium scoparium.

   FIRE - ECOLOGICAL RESEARCH
      Management strategies and consequences

CONSEQUENCES OF ALTERNATIVE RESPONSE STRATEGIES TO WILDLAND FIRES IN THE NORTHERN ROCKIES AND SOUTHWEST IN 2007 & 2008

WHO: Carol Miller - Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute, Seth Carbonari - Flathead National Forest, Dave Calkin - Rocky Mountain Research Station, Tyron Venn - University of Montana

WHAT: This project will evaluate the consequences of alternative responses to 2007 and 2008 wildland fires. We will characterize the consequences of strategies that were actually implemented and contrast those with what could have happened had alternative strategies and tactics been used. Consequences will be characterized in monetary and non-monetary terms. We will quantify effects on fuel loads, future fire behavior, the achievement of different land management objectives and incident management costs. In an effort to broaden the applicability of our results about the factors that influence contrasting outcomes, we evaluate multiple fires from different geographic regions. This study is divided into two parts.

In part 1 of this study, we examine the role of the initial response strategy on outcomes. We ask how the initial response strategy affects outcomes. For each of the study areas, specific objectives are:

  1. Characterize consequences of go/no-go decisions that were made in 2007 and 2008 in terms of effects on fuel loadings and future fire behavior, and effects on ecological objectives for land management.
  2. Through simulation modeling, contrast the actual consequences of those go/no-go decisions with what could have happened had alternative initial response strategies been chosen. Using the simulation results as a guide, contrast the actual incident management costs with the costs that would have been incurred had alternative initial response strategies been chosen.
  3. Determine the extent to which situational factors such as preparedness level and fire danger rating influence the outcomes from different initial response strategies. Outcomes include effects on fuel loadings and future fire behavior, effects on ecological objectives, and incident management costs.

In part 2, in-depth analyses of at least two contrasting incidents will examine the role of extended response strategies and tactics on outcomes. For each of the incidents, specific objectives are:

  1. Characterize consequences of key decisions and extended response strategies in terms of effects on fuel loadings and future fire behavior, and effects on ecological objectives for land management.
  2. Through simulation modeling, contrast the actual consequences of key decisions and extended response strategies with what could have happened had alternative key decisions been made and strategies implemented. Using the simulation results as a guide, contrast the actual costs with the costs that would have been incurred had alternative key decisions and response strategies been chosen.

Work on this project is set to commence in the fall of 2009.

WHEN: 2009-2012

WHERE: Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness, Idaho and Montana; Bob Marshall Wilderness, Montana; Gila-Aldo Leopold Wilderness, New Mexico

      Ecological consequences of management

MACROINVERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGES IN MOUNTAIN STREAMS IN BURNED (WILDLAND AND PRESCRIBED) AND UNBURNED WATERSHEDS ON THE PAYETTE NATIONAL FOREST, IDAHO

WHO: Katherine Strickler - University of Idaho, David Pilliod - Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute

WHAT: This study will characterize the effects of prescribed and wildland fire on aquatic invertebrate communities. Funding is provided by the Joint Fire Sciences Program.

WHEN: 2002-2004

WHERE: Payette National Forest, ID

WHY: To understand the effects of fire and fuel reduction practices on stream ecosystems. This study is part of a larger project examining the effects of fire on amphibians, macroinvertebrates, periphyton, and stream conditions.

EFFECTS OF PRESCRIBED AND WILDLAND FIRE ON AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS IN WESTERN FORESTS

WHO: Steve Corn, David Pilliod - Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute, Bruce Bury, Erin Hyde, Chris Pearl - USGS Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Sciences Center

WHAT: The goal of this study is to quantify and compare the ecological consequences of the following fire conditions on stream ecosystems:

1. unburned forests (fires absent for at least 70 years), 2. understory and prescribed fires 3. stand-replacement fires.

This project is supported by R1/R4 National Fire Plan Adaptive Management and Monitoring funds and the Joint Fire Science Program.

WHEN: 2002-2005

WHERE: South Fork Salmon and Big Creek drainages, central ID; Bitterroot Mountains, MT; Rogue River area of the Siskiyou Mountains, CA, Umpqua River area, and Wallowa Mountains, OR

WHY: Prescription burning and certain lightning-ignited wildland fires are increasingly important management tools used to reduce fuel loads and restore the ecological integrity of western forests. Despite the increased use of fire as a forest restoration tool, there is inadequate information on the ecological effects of prescribed and wildland fires, particularly in aquatic ecosystems. The lack of information on the effects of fire on fish and aquatic wildlife is a major impediment to developing and evaluating fire management policies. In addition, several amphibian and salmonid species in the mountainous regions of the western U.S. are declining, and thus understanding the effects of fire on aquatic ecosystems is increasingly important. Because stream communities often respond to disturbances in complex ways, this project will use multiple biotic and abiotic indicators to evaluate various fire conditions, including amphibians, invertebrates, periphyton, aquatic habitat conditions (temperature, water chemistry, discharge, sedimentation, and large woody debris) and riparian forests. The results of this study will provide critical information necessary for managers to:

1. evaluate the immediate and long-term effects of alternative fire management activities on stream ecosystems, 2. assess how fire management affects the ecological integrity of aquatic ecosystems, and 3. identify potential opportunities to better manage for threatened and endangered aquatic species.

RESEARCH UPDATE: Effects of Prescribed and Wildland Fire on Aquatic Ecosystems in Western Forests

FEATURED PROJECTS: Effects of Prescribed and Wildland Fire on Aquatic Ecosystems in Western Forests - Prescription burning is an important management tool for reducing fuel loads and restoring natural fire cycles to fire-adapted western forests. Implementing a prescription burn usually requires a preliminary assessment of the potential effects of the treatment on the immediate environment. A general lack of information on the effects of fire on sensitive fish and wildlife can be an impediment to evaluating fuel treatment projects on federal lands. Several amphibian and invertebrate species in the western U.S. are sensitive to disturbances that alter aquatic and riparian habitat conditions and water quality. Information on the effects of fire and fuel reducing activities on stream ecosystems is needed to improve science-based fuel management planning. The goal of the project is to understand how fire in upland and riparian forests influences stream communities and determine whether prescription burning mimics the ecological function of fire in a watershed. The project has two components: wildland fire and prescribed fire.

   FIRE - SOCIAL RESEARCH

THE INTERPLAY OF AMR, SUPPRESSION COSTS, COMMUNITY INTERACTION, AND ORGANIZATIONAL PERFORMANCE - A MULTI-DISCIPLINARY APPROACH

WHO: Anne Black - Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute, Toddi Steelman - North Carolina State University, Sarah McCaffrey - Northern Research Station, Krista Gebert - Rocky Mountain Research Station

WHAT: This Joint Fire Science funded project integrates multiple disciplinary perspectives through a mix of quantitative and qualitative methodologies to investigate: 1) key relationships theorized to influence the practice of Appropriate Management Response (AMR), including how community interaction increases or decreases the opportunity to exercise AMR and

2) how the practice of AMR in 2007 and 2008 may/may not contribute to cost containment and organizational performance. By using this approach, we will provide land managers with scientifically grounded information about the interplay of fire management strategies/tactics and wildland fire management costs (to federal, state and local governments), community interaction, and key fire policy objectives (safety, value protection, ecosystem restoration), as well as a protocol for tracking progress.

Cooperators include: Northern Rockies Coordination Group; USFS Region 1, Chuck Stanich (Lolo National Forest), Jack Kirkendall (WO NIMO), WO State and Private Forestry, F&AM,and the 4 NIMO teams.

Other researchers include: Janie Canton-Thompson and Brooke Thompson.

Other funding comes from Jim Saveland (Human Factors and Risk Assessment RD&A), National Fire Plan, and the WO FAM.

WHEN: 2008-2010
Field visits will occur summer of 2008 and summer of 2009, with reporting and interim dialogues during the off-season.

WHERE: Primary focus is on the Northern Rockies Geographic Area and Northern Rockies IMTs (Type 1, 2 and WFU/developmental); however, we are prepared to take advantage of incidents anywhere in the U.S, depending upon 2008 fire activity.

WHY: Wildland fire management must balance the multiple objectives of protecting life, property and resources; reducing hazardous fuels; and restoring ecosystems. Increasingly, these policy imperatives must be met while achieving cost containment. One key to balancing these objectives is exercising management flexibility through the use of Appropriate Management Response (AMR). While AMR is a compelling vision, we lack specifics about the factors that influence strategic and tactical decision-making and the ecologic, economic, and social effects of management actions.

PRODUCTS:
Leopold Institute Publications
Black, Anne .E.; Gebert, Krista; McCaffrey, Sarah; Steelman, Toddi; and Janie Canton-Thompson. 2009. A Multi-Disciplinary Approach to Fire Management Strategy, Suppression Costs, Community Interaction, and Organizational Performance. Fire Management Today 69(2): 11-14.
Leopold Publication Number 682

Black, Anne E. 2009. The Key Decision Log: Facilitating High Reliability and Organizational Learning. 2009. Fire Management Today. 69(2): 5-10.
Leopold Publication Number 683



KDL Update 12/1/2008
- Summary of 2008 activities and priorities for 2009

Key Decision Log - (additional project information)

Key Decision Log (FSWEB data entry) - This website provides for on-line data entry and reports as well as project background for all Host Unit fire managers and Incident Management Team users.

IMT Center website - Look for ’Key Decision Log’ under the Decision Support page in the ’Lessons Learned in Large Fire Maangement. This provides non-Forest Service partners with project documentation and electronic downloads of data collection forms.

Overview of the Key Decision Log - (pdf - 450 kb)

Final Report - The interplay of AMR, suppression costs, agency-community interaction, and organizational performance - a multi-disciplinary approach.

DEVELOPMENT AND DELIVERY OF SCIENCE SYNTHESIS:FUELSTOOLS AND TRAINING MATERIALS

WHO: Anne Black - Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute, Toddi Steelman - North Carolina State University, Sarah McCaffrey - Northern Research Station, Krista Gebert - Rocky Mountain Research Station

WHAT: We seek to strategically improve dissemination of the national Science Synthesis:FuelsTools, which resulted from the Science Synthesis and Integration project (also known as Applied Wildland Fire Research in support of Project Level Hazardous Fuels Planning). For more information on the preceding project, please visit: http://www.fs.fed.us/fire/tech_transfer/synthesis/synthesis_index.

An initial set of interviews with recent trainees and users will provide a comprehensive evaluation of existing dissemination and training materials. The evaluation will guide development of additional training and support documentation and allow us to more effectively target potential users. Through the evaluation phase, we also seek to identify and describe the replicable and general tasks involved in the phases of knowledge diffusion described in the diffusion of inovation literature.

Activities include: - evaluation of FY05 training mechanisms - development of web-based trainings and case examples - update of the existing website - capture and publication of findings and lessons learned to assist others in conducting similar work or training activities - provision of consultations, presentations and trainings.

WHEN: 2005-2006

WHERE: Western United States

WHY: Specifically, the national Science Synthesis effort represented a significant expenditure of National Fire Plan funds and research effort. However, to gain maximum value from this effort, land management staff need to know about the tools and how to use them. More generally, knowledge of the effectiveness of various training media - fact sheets, General Technical Reports, workshops, presentations - is often compiled locally by project staff, but remains largely distributed and thus unavailable for others to learn from, improve or emulate.

PRODUCTS:
Leopold Institute Publications
Black, Anne .E.; Gebert, Krista; McCaffrey, Sarah; Steelman, Toddi; and Janie Canton-Thompson. 2009. A Multi-Disciplinary Approach to Fire Management Strategy, Suppression Costs, Community Interaction, and Organizational Performance. Fire Management Today 69(2): 11-14.
Leopold Publication Number 682

Black, Anne E. 2009. The Key Decision Log: Facilitating High Reliability and Organizational Learning. 2009. Fire Management Today. 69(2): 5-10.
Leopold Publication Number 683



KDL Update 12/1/2008
- Summary of 2008 activities and priorities for 2009

Key Decision Log - (additional project information)

Key Decision Log (FSWEB data entry) - This website provides for on-line data entry and reports as well as project background for all Host Unit fire managers and Incident Management Team users.

IMT Center website - Look for ’Key Decision Log’ under the Decision Support page in the ’Lessons Learned in Large Fire Maangement. This provides non-Forest Service partners with project documentation and electronic downloads of data collection forms.

Overview of the Key Decision Log - (pdf - 450 kb)

Final Report - The interplay of AMR, suppression costs, agency-community interaction, and organizational performance - a multi-disciplinary approach.

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL INFLUENCES TO THE SUCCESS OF SCIENCE DELIVERY AND APPLICATION EFFORTS

WHO: Anne Black - Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute, Toddi Steelman - North Carolina State University, Sarah McCaffrey - Northern Research Station, Krista Gebert - Rocky Mountain Research Station

WHAT: The project consists of three parts: (1) a literature review of social, psychology, and organizational communication theories that address the adoption of new ideas and approaches, (2) agency case studies, and (3) a national survey of wilderness managers. For each case study, we will engage in conversations with managers including local and centralized decision makers and resource (fire, fuels, wildlife) staff specialists, to meet the following objectives:

  • examine the roles that science currently plays in management,
  • gain a better understanding of how land managers access and use science,
  • gain a better understanding of how researchers successfully disseminate scientific information and/or work with managers,
  • identify specific barriers that limit managers’ ability to access and use science, and
  • identify potential tools and techniques for improving managers’ access to and use of science.
Information gathered during the case studies will be used to develop part two of this project, a broader quantitative survey of managers responsible for managing fire, fuels, or wildlife in each wilderness management agency.

WHEN: 2004-2007

WHERE: Various locations

WHY: Our broad goal is to understand and improve the delivery and use of science for public land management, emphasizing wilderness issues. To achieve this goal, we are synthesizing knowledge from a variety of social science disciplines. We will use this to provide insight into how land managers access and use scientific resources. The results of this study will be used to prioritize Research Application Program efforts to bridge the gap between wilderness science and management. In addition, we will share our conclusions with both researchers and managers of U.S. public land management agencies, contributing to the broader objective of improving communication among researchers and managers.

PRODUCTS:
Leopold Institute Publications
Black, Anne .E.; Gebert, Krista; McCaffrey, Sarah; Steelman, Toddi; and Janie Canton-Thompson. 2009. A Multi-Disciplinary Approach to Fire Management Strategy, Suppression Costs, Community Interaction, and Organizational Performance. Fire Management Today 69(2): 11-14.
Leopold Publication Number 682

Black, Anne E. 2009. The Key Decision Log: Facilitating High Reliability and Organizational Learning. 2009. Fire Management Today. 69(2): 5-10.
Leopold Publication Number 683



KDL Update 12/1/2008
- Summary of 2008 activities and priorities for 2009

Key Decision Log - (additional project information)

Key Decision Log (FSWEB data entry) - This website provides for on-line data entry and reports as well as project background for all Host Unit fire managers and Incident Management Team users.

IMT Center website - Look for ’Key Decision Log’ under the Decision Support page in the ’Lessons Learned in Large Fire Maangement. This provides non-Forest Service partners with project documentation and electronic downloads of data collection forms.

Overview of the Key Decision Log - (pdf - 450 kb)

Final Report - The interplay of AMR, suppression costs, agency-community interaction, and organizational performance - a multi-disciplinary approach.

      Constraints to wilderness fire management

PREDICTING INDIVIDUAL RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT NEAR WILDERNESS FOR STRATEGICALLY PLANNING FUEL TREATMENTS IN THE BITTERROOT NATIONAL FOREST, MONTANA

WHO: Neal Christensen, Peter Landres - Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute

WHAT: This study statistically models and predicts the likelihood of undeveloped private land adjacent to a national forest being developed with one or more residential structures over a five-year period. The overall purpose of this project is to predict future rural development in the wildland-urban interface to allow fire management staff to plan fuels treatments that reduce risks to public safety and property.

WHEN: 2001-2005

WHERE: Portions of Ravalli County, MT, adjacent to the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness

WHY: One of the principal reasons that naturally-ignited fires in wilderness are suppressed is the perceived risk that these fires will run out of the wilderness and threaten lives and harm property. If fire staff could plan future fuels treatments to reduce this risk in areas that will likely become future wildland-urban interface areas, there is a greater likelihood that natural ignitions in wilderness will be allowed to burn unimpeded.

   FIRE - RISK ASSESSMENT

CONSEQUENCES OF ALTERNATIVE RESPONSE STRATEGIES TO WILDLAND FIRES IN THE NORTHERN ROCKIES AND SOUTHWEST IN 2007 & 2008

WHO: Carol Miller - Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute, Seth Carbonari - Flathead National Forest, Dave Calkin - Rocky Mountain Research Station, Tyron Venn - University of Montana

WHAT: This project will evaluate the consequences of alternative responses to 2007 and 2008 wildland fires. We will characterize the consequences of strategies that were actually implemented and contrast those with what could have happened had alternative strategies and tactics been used. Consequences will be characterized in monetary and non-monetary terms. We will quantify effects on fuel loads, future fire behavior, the achievement of different land management objectives and incident management costs. In an effort to broaden the applicability of our results about the factors that influence contrasting outcomes, we evaluate multiple fires from different geographic regions. This study is divided into two parts.

In part 1 of this study, we examine the role of the initial response strategy on outcomes. We ask how the initial response strategy affects outcomes. For each of the study areas, specific objectives are:

  1. Characterize consequences of go/no-go decisions that were made in 2007 and 2008 in terms of effects on fuel loadings and future fire behavior, and effects on ecological objectives for land management.
  2. Through simulation modeling, contrast the actual consequences of those go/no-go decisions with what could have happened had alternative initial response strategies been chosen. Using the simulation results as a guide, contrast the actual incident management costs with the costs that would have been incurred had alternative initial response strategies been chosen.
  3. Determine the extent to which situational factors such as preparedness level and fire danger rating influence the outcomes from different initial response strategies. Outcomes include effects on fuel loadings and future fire behavior, effects on ecological objectives, and incident management costs.

In part 2, in-depth analyses of at least two contrasting incidents will examine the role of extended response strategies and tactics on outcomes. For each of the incidents, specific objectives are:

  1. Characterize consequences of key decisions and extended response strategies in terms of effects on fuel loadings and future fire behavior, and effects on ecological objectives for land management.
  2. Through simulation modeling, contrast the actual consequences of key decisions and extended response strategies with what could have happened had alternative key decisions been made and strategies implemented. Using the simulation results as a guide, contrast the actual costs with the costs that would have been incurred had alternative key decisions and response strategies been chosen.

Work on this project is set to commence in the fall of 2009.

WHEN: 2009-2012

WHERE: Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness, Idaho and Montana; Bob Marshall Wilderness, Montana; Gila-Aldo Leopold Wilderness, New Mexico

THE INTERPLAY OF AMR, SUPPRESSION COSTS, COMMUNITY INTERACTION, AND ORGANIZATIONAL PERFORMANCE - A MULTI-DISCIPLINARY APPROACH

WHO: Anne Black - Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute, Toddi Steelman - North Carolina State University, Sarah McCaffrey - Northern Research Station, Krista Gebert - Rocky Mountain Research Station

WHAT: This Joint Fire Science funded project integrates multiple disciplinary perspectives through a mix of quantitative and qualitative methodologies to investigate: 1) key relationships theorized to influence the practice of Appropriate Management Response (AMR), including how community interaction increases or decreases the opportunity to exercise AMR and

2) how the practice of AMR in 2007 and 2008 may/may not contribute to cost containment and organizational performance. By using this approach, we will provide land managers with scientifically grounded information about the interplay of fire management strategies/tactics and wildland fire management costs (to federal, state and local governments), community interaction, and key fire policy objectives (safety, value protection, ecosystem restoration), as well as a protocol for tracking progress.

Cooperators include: Northern Rockies Coordination Group; USFS Region 1, Chuck Stanich (Lolo National Forest), Jack Kirkendall (WO NIMO), WO State and Private Forestry, F&AM,and the 4 NIMO teams.

Other researchers include: Janie Canton-Thompson and Brooke Thompson.

Other funding comes from Jim Saveland (Human Factors and Risk Assessment RD&A), National Fire Plan, and the WO FAM.

WHEN: 2008-2010
Field visits will occur summer of 2008 and summer of 2009, with reporting and interim dialogues during the off-season.

WHERE: Primary focus is on the Northern Rockies Geographic Area and Northern Rockies IMTs (Type 1, 2 and WFU/developmental); however, we are prepared to take advantage of incidents anywhere in the U.S, depending upon 2008 fire activity.

WHY: Wildland fire management must balance the multiple objectives of protecting life, property and resources; reducing hazardous fuels; and restoring ecosystems. Increasingly, these policy imperatives must be met while achieving cost containment. One key to balancing these objectives is exercising management flexibility through the use of Appropriate Management Response (AMR). While AMR is a compelling vision, we lack specifics about the factors that influence strategic and tactical decision-making and the ecologic, economic, and social effects of management actions.

PRODUCTS:
Leopold Institute Publications
Black, Anne .E.; Gebert, Krista; McCaffrey, Sarah; Steelman, Toddi; and Janie Canton-Thompson. 2009. A Multi-Disciplinary Approach to Fire Management Strategy, Suppression Costs, Community Interaction, and Organizational Performance. Fire Management Today 69(2): 11-14.
Leopold Publication Number 682

Black, Anne E. 2009. The Key Decision Log: Facilitating High Reliability and Organizational Learning. 2009. Fire Management Today. 69(2): 5-10.
Leopold Publication Number 683



KDL Update 12/1/2008
- Summary of 2008 activities and priorities for 2009

Key Decision Log - (additional project information)

Key Decision Log (FSWEB data entry) - This website provides for on-line data entry and reports as well as project background for all Host Unit fire managers and Incident Management Team users.

IMT Center website - Look for ’Key Decision Log’ under the Decision Support page in the ’Lessons Learned in Large Fire Maangement. This provides non-Forest Service partners with project documentation and electronic downloads of data collection forms.

Overview of the Key Decision Log - (pdf - 450 kb)

Final Report - The interplay of AMR, suppression costs, agency-community interaction, and organizational performance - a multi-disciplinary approach.

PREDICTING INDIVIDUAL RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT NEAR WILDERNESS FOR STRATEGICALLY PLANNING FUEL TREATMENTS IN THE BITTERROOT NATIONAL FOREST, MONTANA

WHO: Anne Black - Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute, Toddi Steelman - North Carolina State University, Sarah McCaffrey - Northern Research Station, Krista Gebert - Rocky Mountain Research Station

WHAT: This study statistically models and predicts the likelihood of undeveloped private land adjacent to a national forest being developed with one or more residential structures over a five-year period. The overall purpose of this project is to predict future rural development in the wildland-urban interface to allow fire management staff to plan fuels treatments that reduce risks to public safety and property.

WHEN: 2001-2005

WHERE: Portions of Ravalli County, MT, adjacent to the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness

WHY: One of the principal reasons that naturally-ignited fires in wilderness are suppressed is the perceived risk that these fires will run out of the wilderness and threaten lives and harm property. If fire staff could plan future fuels treatments to reduce this risk in areas that will likely become future wildland-urban interface areas, there is a greater likelihood that natural ignitions in wilderness will be allowed to burn unimpeded.

PRODUCTS:
Leopold Institute Publications
Black, Anne .E.; Gebert, Krista; McCaffrey, Sarah; Steelman, Toddi; and Janie Canton-Thompson. 2009. A Multi-Disciplinary Approach to Fire Management Strategy, Suppression Costs, Community Interaction, and Organizational Performance. Fire Management Today 69(2): 11-14.
Leopold Publication Number 682

Black, Anne E. 2009. The Key Decision Log: Facilitating High Reliability and Organizational Learning. 2009. Fire Management Today. 69(2): 5-10.
Leopold Publication Number 683



KDL Update 12/1/2008
- Summary of 2008 activities and priorities for 2009

Key Decision Log - (additional project information)

Key Decision Log (FSWEB data entry) - This website provides for on-line data entry and reports as well as project background for all Host Unit fire managers and Incident Management Team users.

IMT Center website - Look for ’Key Decision Log’ under the Decision Support page in the ’Lessons Learned in Large Fire Maangement. This provides non-Forest Service partners with project documentation and electronic downloads of data collection forms.

Overview of the Key Decision Log - (pdf - 450 kb)

Final Report - The interplay of AMR, suppression costs, agency-community interaction, and organizational performance - a multi-disciplinary approach.

EVALUATING THE EFFECTS OF MANAGEMENT-IGNITED FIRE ON THE INFLUX OF EXOTIC PLANTS IN WILDERNESS

WHO: Anne Black - Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute, Toddi Steelman - North Carolina State University, Sarah McCaffrey - Northern Research Station, Krista Gebert - Rocky Mountain Research Station

WHAT: This project is designed to determine whether exotic plants invade areas where management-ignited prescribed fires have been used to reduce fuels and restore a more natural fire regime.

WHEN: 2000-2003

WHERE: Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness, ID

WHY: Wilderness and fire managers want to restore the role of fire to wilderness after decades of fire suppression. In addition to natural ignitions, management-ignited fire is also being considered in wilderness. But many exotic plants are disturbance specialists and they currently surround most wildernesses, so there is great concern that fire will now allow these exotics a foothold from which they may spread throughout the wilderness, in effect trading one problem (lack of fire) for another (exotic plants). This research will give managers information about whether exotic plants are likely to invade naturally-ignited or management-ignited burn areas in wilderness, allowing them to analyze tradeoffs between restoring fire and the potential for introducing exotic plants, as well as planning mitigation strategies for these exotics in those areas where their invasion is most likely.

PRODUCTS:
Leopold Institute Publications
Black, Anne .E.; Gebert, Krista; McCaffrey, Sarah; Steelman, Toddi; and Janie Canton-Thompson. 2009. A Multi-Disciplinary Approach to Fire Management Strategy, Suppression Costs, Community Interaction, and Organizational Performance. Fire Management Today 69(2): 11-14.
Leopold Publication Number 682

Black, Anne E. 2009. The Key Decision Log: Facilitating High Reliability and Organizational Learning. 2009. Fire Management Today. 69(2): 5-10.
Leopold Publication Number 683



KDL Update 12/1/2008
- Summary of 2008 activities and priorities for 2009

Key Decision Log - (additional project information)

Key Decision Log (FSWEB data entry) - This website provides for on-line data entry and reports as well as project background for all Host Unit fire managers and Incident Management Team users.

IMT Center website - Look for ’Key Decision Log’ under the Decision Support page in the ’Lessons Learned in Large Fire Maangement. This provides non-Forest Service partners with project documentation and electronic downloads of data collection forms.

Overview of the Key Decision Log - (pdf - 450 kb)

Final Report - The interplay of AMR, suppression costs, agency-community interaction, and organizational performance - a multi-disciplinary approach.

Back to List

Back to Research Program

HOME  |  RESEARCH PROGRAM  |  RESEARCH APPLICATION PROGRAM
ABOUT US  |  STAFF  |  HOT TOPICS  |  PUBLICATIONS  |  PROJECTS
CONFERENCES & WORKSHOPS  |  DATABASES & LINKS  |  SITEMAP