Chris Armatas

Education

  • University of Montana, Missoula, MT, Masters of Science, December 2012
    Major: Resource Conservation

  • St. Lawrence University, Canton, NY, Bachelor of Arts, May 2005
    Major: Economics

Background

Chris is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Forestry at the University of Montana. The focus of his Ph.D. is to better understand the applied field of ‘ecological economics’, which has been defined as a transdisciplinary approach that incorporates different ways of knowing with the goal of addressing practical issues. As an early career researcher, Chris interests have evolved from a narrow focus on applying economic principles for sustainable natural resource management to a more holistic approach that better incorporates both quantitative and qualitative social science methods. After completing a Master’s degree at the University of Montana in Resource Conservation, Chris spent two years as a research associate working on issues related to ecosystem service valuation, social vulnerability to climate and land-use change, and applications of traditional phenological knowledge for adaptive management in the context of climate and fire. In addition, the experience of archiving the majority of wilderness social science data sets developed by the Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute highlighted the broad range of issues, and potential methods for addressing those issues, in the field of protected area management.

Publications

Armatas, C. A., Venn, T. J., and Watson, A. E. (2014). Applying Q-methodology to select and define attributes for non-market valuation: A case study from Northwest Wyoming, United States. Ecological Economics 107, 447-456. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolecon.2014.09.010.

Armatas, C. A., Venn, T. J., and Watson, A. E. (2014). Applying Q-methodology to select and define attributes for non-market valuation: A case study from northwest Wyoming, United States. Paper presented on July 2, 2014 at the World Congress for Environmental and Resource Economists, Istanbul, Turkey.

Armatas, C. A., (2013). The Importance of Water-Based Ecosystem Services Derived from the Shoshone National Forest. Thesis. The University of Montana, Missoula, Montana, USA. Available at URL: http://etd.lib.umt.edu/theses/available/etd-01242013-102813/.

Armatas, C. A. (2013). Defining Multiple Perspectives Regarding the Importance of Water-based Ecosystem Services from the Shoshone National Forest in northwest, WY, USA. Poster presented in October 2013 at WILD10 in Salamanca, Spain. Available at URL: http://leopold.wilderness.net/WILD10/posters/armatas_da.pdf.

Armatas, C. A., Venn, T. J., McBride, B., Watson, A. E., and Carver, S. (2014 in review). Opportunities to utilize traditional phenological knowledge to support adaptive management of social-ecological systems vulnerable to changes in climate and fire regimes. Submitted to Ecology and Society.